Forbidden Agendas

Khamsin – An Anthology (1976-1983): FORBIDDEN AGENDAS: Intolerance and Defiance in the Middle East

Selected and Introduced by Jon Rothscild
Al Saqi Books, 1984, Distributed by Zed Press

Yet to be uploaded to this site:

Women

Civil War in Lebanon

  • In the Maelstrom of Confessionalism – by Nada Kadir

Religion

To Live Together ‒ a Dialogue between Said Hammami and Moshé Machover

2017-10-07T20:25:30+02:00October 1, 1984|Categories: Documents, Forbidden Agendas|Tags: , , |

Whatever may be said about Hammami's political views on particular points, there is no denying the non-sectarianism of his attitude to the Israeli Jewish population: he recognizes that they constitute a nationality just as much as the Palestinian Arabs, and that they, too, are entitled to national right in Palestine. To hear a Palestinian spokesman say this was not necessarily congenial to fanatics on both sides.

Eli Lobel

2013-12-29T04:54:06+02:00July 10, 1980|Categories: Articles, Forbidden Agendas, Khamsin 7|Tags: |

Khamsin is bereaved. Eli Lobel, editor and founder of our journal, has died tragically on Thursday, October 4th 1979. The life-story of this outstanding revolutionary socialist and great internationalist is, in more than one way, the story of a whole generation, the tragedies and noble struggles of a whole epoch.

Arab Women – Magida Salman

2014-04-13T13:49:06+02:00October 10, 1978|Categories: Articles, Forbidden Agendas, Khamsin 6|Tags: |

Legislation dealing with marriage, divorce, and the status of women (inferior in all cases) is still based on, or directly inspired by, Koranic law in all the Arab-Islamic states. What role is played by Islam, what is its influence, and how is it used in the oppression of Arab women.

Ideology without revolution: Jewish women in Israel – Dina Hecht and Nira Yuval-Davis

2013-08-13T15:35:28+02:00October 10, 1978|Categories: Articles, Forbidden Agendas, Khamsin 6|Tags: , |

The myth of the supposed liberation and equality of Israeli women, while perhaps gratifying a deep-seated need for feminists in search of identity, cajoles most Israeli women into a state of spirited resignation – content with a public image that bears little or no resemblance to their actual situation.